Ways to prevent dating violence

Posted by / 15-Jan-2018 03:58

If you think your son or daughter may be controlling, abusive, or violent with his or her partner, tell your child that abuse and violence are NOT acceptable and that violence will not solve problems.

Let him or her know when you truly care for someone you don’t hurt them or try to control them.

And, while your teen needs you more than ever to help them through this challenging time, they are also seeking independence and turning to peers.

While it may seem easier to let your teen shake you loose, hang on. Right now, your teen is forming relationships that set the stage for future relationships.

February is National Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month Dating violence can happen to any teen in a romantic, dating, or sexual relationship, anytime, anywhere. Learn how to prevent teen dating violence and to promote healthy relationships with CDC's online resources.

Did you know that in a recent national survey, 1 in 10 teens reported being hit or physically hurt on purpose by a boyfriend or girlfriend at least once in the 12 months before the survey?

Recognizing an Abusive Personality Identifying Abuse Leaving an Abusive Relationship Community Q&A A relationship can be abusive in many ways, but ultimately, abuse boils down to power and control.

Teens often think some behaviors, like teasing and name-calling, are a “normal” part of a relationship.Additionally, during the 12 months before the survey, 1 in 10 teens reported they had been kissed, touched, or physically forced to have sexual intercourse when they did not want to at least once by someone they were dating.Talk to teens about the importance of developing healthy, respectful relationships.Many teens do not report it because they are afraid to tell friends and family. Youth who experience dating violence are more likely to experience the following: Additionally, youth who are victims of dating violence in high school are at higher risk for victimization during college.A 2017 CDC Report [PDF 4.32MB] found that approximately 7% of women and 4% of men who ever experienced rape, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner first experienced some form of partner violence by that partner before 18 years of age. Communicating with your partner, managing uncomfortable emotions like anger and jealousy, and treating others with respect are a few ways to keep relationships healthy and nonviolent.

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Given that 1 in 5 high schoolers experience dating violence, you’ll want to be sure you do your part to help your child understand what a healthy relationship feels and looks like.